The trouble with being first is someone with bigger backing is likely to steal your thunder.


It’s been going on for weeks, the deluge of spam about personal protective equipment of one sort of another. But this one is special.


A recent spate of cases in the USA has, after the best part of a decade, concluded that crypto-assets are to be regarded as property.

Seriously: this is one of the simplest things to work out and courts – and legislatures – have been making a meal out of something that is blindingly obvious.

Yet, bizarrely, it’s not only US courts that are finding this difficult.


As lockdowns continue – and are eased – there is an obvious but forgotten crisis that has already begun but is going to get far, far, worse.

And this time it’s a human not an economic or medical crisis.


We’ve added around 1,000 subscribers since the last newsletter so, to you, thank you and to those who’ve been on the list for, in some cases, getting on for 20 years, thanks for your patience over the past few months while other things have taken priority.


In one of the worst kept secrets of recent times, the case of Rihan v EY Global and others has reached its first major milestone – a formal hearing before the English High Court. It’s all about money laundering, skulduggery and all that sexy stuff.

But that’s just froth.

The real meat of the Order comes in the far less seductive part of the case – the choice of venue and corporate responsibility for downstream malfeasance.


What more can I say than here is proof : artificial intelligence is not ready for prime time in the financial sector.


There are many things that make me shake my head and wonder how come the world is full of “experts” on things that are common sense.

Is there no common sense any longer? Are we moribund unless someone tells us what to do and, even, how to do it.

And does that stasis even extend to thinking?

Apparently, we now need to be taught about “critical thinking.”


As I am putting to bed what might be the most ambitious project we will tackle for a while at financialcrimeriskandcompliancetraining.com , a course designed for teenagers and young people up to 24 years of age on avoiding being a victim of financial crime, one big issue has been added at the last minute – the range of conduct that criminals are adopting as their response to the coronavirus / CoVid-19 epidemic / pandemic. Across the world, there are more and more examples of conduct, both in both the physical and cyber worlds.

While doing that, I’ve been doing the final checks on...


The world is mad. There is an overwhelming sense of a need to belong.


Apparently, LegalTech has become a thing.

I’m already bored with it.

Why?

That’s what someone asked me and I told them .

Here it is.


Good grief. This blog has always been a bit sporadic but now it looks downright dilatory.

So, you’d think that, except for one post last month I’d slept the winter away, wouldn’t you?

Nah.

There’s a story and this is the biggest milestone.

At least for now. There’s more to come.


It’s the everyday challenge for the financial crime risk officer.

There is something he’s not satisfied with but he can’t prove it – it’s his experience, what some call his “gut reaction” that says “this doesn’t stack up. We shouldn’t do this business.”

But there are reasons why the business should be done.

There is a fundamental imbalance and, incredibly, a fundamental irony.


This blog was originally published as ” OK. Call me a contrarian if you want but you are wrong.” with “The falsely accused contrarian and the bubble people.” as a subtitle. In February 2021, this was reversed when the blog was recorded for a BLOG/cast.

Listen to the BLOG/cast at www.financialcrimebroadcasting.com


My father, Roy, died on 11 June 2016 after a sudden decline in his general condition.

This is my tribute to him.


David Cameron, speaking in Japan where he is attending the G7 Summit, has said that the young, in Britain, should register to vote. He says it may be the most important vote of their lives and it is for them to decide what kind of country they want to live in. He’s exactly right.

And when they do, they should vote to leave the EU. This is why. And as someone who supported the “yes” vote in 1975, I start with a mea culpa.


I woke this morning expecting to pack for a trip, do a few bits and pieces at work, put the data I need for travel onto a portable drive and clean the house so I don’t come back to a dump, all after enjoying the first cup of tar-like coffee that starts my day.

As usual, while the espresso machine was heating up, I looked at the overnight e-mails. There, right in plain view, was another example of why the internet needs a major clean up.


The William Rhodes Secondary Technical School in Chesterfield was often the school of choice, above the grammar school for those who passed their 11 Plus examination. On the recommendation of my junior school headmaster, I went there: it was, he said "a school for individuals." It was wonderful and when I had to move to another area, I was heartbroken.

In the intervening years, things have...


A report in The Guardian says that the leader of the “eBible Fellowship” has announced that the world will end on 7th October.


There is no doubt that strong action is needed against Da’esh / ISIS / ISIL. But have we lost sight of the fact that the brutality of Syrian President Assad against Syrians was the catalyst for the current conflict and foreign intervention?


There’s a serious problem in Financial Crime Risk Management and Compliance: the lack of precision in language means no one knows where they stand.


I’m amused by the social media campaigns for Corbyn as an icon of socialism in the UK.

It seems that he’s the man for everyone – so long as you are from a minority that he can claim to support or a self-interest group that can garner votes from its members.


We all make mistakes and often for the best of reasons.

Often, it’s difficult to make the judgement to correct them, partly because of ego, partly because we don’t know what’s gone wrong and therefore a fix is nothing more than a shot in the dark, or sometimes it’s because we know what has gone wrong but we don’t understand why it has gone wrong.


In terms of sentencing in English law, there is, in effect, an upper figure. Murder is generally subject to a life term, but convicts are released “on licence” – some earlier than later but, if they are going to be released at all, rarely more than 14 years. The maximum sentence for theft, robbery, money laundering, terrorist financing is, in each case, 14 years per count.